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It’s difficult to find an accurate source of information regarding research on Cannabis. We came up with the idea of gathering the conclusions from 5 studies on the effects of CBD and Cannabis for acne.

2016: Differential Effectiveness Of Selected Non-psychotropic Phytocannabinoids On Human Sebocyte Functions Implicates Their Introduction In Dry/seborrheic Skin And Acne Treatment

Key Findings

CBC and THCV suppressed sebaceous lipid synthesis, CBDV had only minor effects, whereas CBG and CBGV increased it. Importantly, CBC, CBDV and THCV significantly reduced arachidonic acid (AA)-induced “acne-like” lipogenesis. Moreover, THCV suppressed proliferation, and all phytocannabinoids exerted remarkable anti-inflammatory actions. Our data suggest that CBG and CBGV may have potential in the treatment of dry-skin syndrome, whereas CBC, CBDV and especially THCV show promise to become highly efficient, novel anti-acne agents.

In other words: CBD and other Cannabinoïds may have a lot of potential both again dry-skin and again acne.

Information and Links

Drugs Used

  • CBC
  • CBDV
  • CBG
  • CBGV
  • THCV
The research CBD as a treatment for acne gives very encouraging preliminary results
The research CBD as a treatment for acne gives very encouraging preliminary results

 


2014: Cannabidiol Exerts Sebostatic And Antiinflammatory Effects On Human Sebocytes

Key Findings

CBD has potential as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

Information and Links

Drugs Used

  • CBD

2014: TRP Channel Cannabinoid Receptors In Skin Sensation, Homeostasis, And Inflammation

Key Findings

The skin possesses a robust capacity to synthesize and respond to cannabinoids. In human skin, CB1 is expressed in keratinocytes within the more differentiated epidermal layers, hair follicle cells, sebaceous glands, sensory neurons, and immune cells. CB2 is expressed in keratinocytes, sebaceous glands, sensory neurons, and immune cells. The functional effects of cannabinoids on skin can be divided into four general categories: (1) Regulation of epidermal homeostasis. (2) Regulation of pain sensation. (3) Regulation of skin inflammation. (4) Regulation of skin appendages. Cannabinoids can engage numerous targets within the skin, including not only metabotropic receptors, but also multiple members of the TRP family of ion channels. Cutaneous ionotropic cannabinoid receptors participate in functions related to pain and itch perception, epidermal homeostasis, and the promotion and suppression of dermatitis in both animal models and humans. This situation creates potential opportunities to intervene therapeutically in sensory and inflammatory skin diseases using the chemically rich pharmacology of cannabinoids.

Information and Links

Drugs Used

  • Endocannabinoids
  • Cannabinoids

2009: The Endocannabinoid System Of The Skin In Health And Disease: Novel Perspectives And Therapeutic Opportunities

Key Findings

“. . . targeted manipulation of the ECS ( . . . ) might be beneficial in a multitude of human skin diseases.”

Information and Links

Drugs Used

  • Endocannabinoids
  • Cannabinoids

2008: Endocannabinoids Enhance Lipid Synthesis And Apoptosis Of Human Sebocytes Via Cannabinoid Receptor-2-mediated Signaling

Key Findings

Sebocytes express CB2 but not CB1. Also, anandamide and 2-AG are present in SZ95 sebocytes and dose-dependently induce lipid production and (chiefly apoptosis-driven) cell death. Endocannabinoids also up-regulate the expression of key genes involved in lipid synthesis. CB2 antagonists or agonists therefore deserve to be explored in the management of skin disorders characterized by sebaceous gland dysfunctions (e.g., acne vulgaris, seborrhea, dry skin).

Information and Links

Drugs Used

  • Anandamide (AEA)
  • 2-AG

 

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